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/sci/ - Science & Math


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1672658 No.1672658 [Reply] [Original] [archived.moe]

I slept through most of my econ classes in cumulative ed, but as someone who grew up after the transition I'd be glad to tell you everything I know.

>> No.1672767 [DELETED] 

Hm. Well, okay. If there's no interest I won't bother you.

>> No.1672799
Quoted by: >>1672819 >>1674113

Have you ever read "UFO Contact from Planet Iarga" by Stefan Denaerde?

If you're interested in post-scarcity economics, I HIGHLY recommend it.

>> No.1672819
Quoted by: >>1672856 >>1674113

>>1672799

No, when was it published? My only exposure to the particulars of post scarcity economics has been from textbooks and documentaries.

>> No.1672856

>>1672819

I believe 1966. Supposedly it's the story of a sailor with his family who meets some aliens in a bay in Holland. They describe the ethics and economics used throughout the entire universe by advanced civilizations.

I never cared whether or not it really happened, what mattered to me was the information about how to build a stable world-wide economy. Either these aliens speak from experience, or the writer wrote a fiction book to demonstrate his ideas. If it's the latter, I gotta say he's a genius.

I never knew there was a name for the stuff he described until I googled "post scarcity economics".

Anyway, there is an english translation on amazon used for 15 bucks, if you search for "iarga".

You can also find it to read for free online, but I won't link it because I'm not sure of the rules on this board.

>> No.1672870
Quoted by: >>1672907

>>1672856
>but I won't link it because I'm not sure of the rules on this board.
Don't be a pussy. /sci/ has no mods.

>> No.1672907

>>1672870
Took me 5 mins to find it in google...

>> No.1672922

go back to /r9k/ you faggot

>> No.1672987
Quoted by: >>1673002 >>1674113

>>1672856

In the book, how did the aliens achieve post-scarcity? Autolabor isn't true post scarcity, it's just called that. Resources are still finite, it's only that labor is fully automated and there's a continual effort to find substitute materials so that when one resource runs out we can seamlessly switch to the next. Bioplastics are a good example of this.

>> No.1673002

>>1672987
It's been my impression that "post-scarcity" is simply when, due to advancing technology and stabilized population growth (just look at the first-world now), the resouces/energy per capita becomes humongous.

>> No.1673019
Quoted by: >>1673935

I have an economics major, all I ever did was draw lines and moved the lines when the other lines moved. I never came to class. All the exams were drawing lines, demand lines, supply lines, interest rate lines, real wage lines, unemployment lines. Horizontal lines, vertical lines, diagonal lines, kinked-demand lines, curvy parabolic lines.

Lines, lines everywhere. I hate econ.

>> No.1673058
Quoted by: >>1673112 >>1673299

>>1673002

Sounds about right. The nuclear renaissance happened in tandem with the transition to autolabor. Most autolabor compounds (clusters of robotic farms, factories, mines, etc.) are powered by a combination of thorium reactors, heliostats and hydro/geothermal.

There was a lot of anxiety about the possibility that the wealthiest 10% would own all of the robots, and the remaining 90% would be 'unnecessary'. It might've turned out that way too, if not for the war.

>> No.1673077
Quoted by: >>1673086

>>1673002
Post-Scarcity is when you eliminate a scarcity based economy. We were real close to having one until some politicians decided they'd rather have personal power than guaranteed survival.

Dark Ages 2 is gonna be hella fun.

>> No.1673086
Quoted by: >>1673131

>>1673077

If by "Dark ages 2" you mean the civil war, then yeah. Dirtest war ever fought.

>> No.1673112
Quoted by: >>1673146

>>1673058
Okay, I'm quite sure your trolling, but damn you do put a lot of info in when you describe where (or when) you've come from.

Who's the winner of the 2012 or 2016 US Presidential elections, bitch? And if you say 'Oh I was asleep in my history class' then yeah, you're done.

>> No.1673131

>>1673086
What's so dirty about it? I mean, once we have suicide bombers and weapons of mass destruction, it's hard to see how much dirtier it can get. Engineered plagues?

>> No.1673146

>>1673112

Chelsea Clinton in 2012, and Jim Maynard in 2016.

I'm aware Chelsea's age makes her ineligible. But in my timeline a constitutional amendment was passed well before 2010 that revised elgibilitiy criteria, not just age but clarifying the eligibility of dual citizenship holders as well.

Whenever I post there's some number of people who only want me to prove that I'm posting from a future and who, if satisfied that I'm being truthful, would then want to use me as their personal fortune teller.

The nature of ETP is that there are necessarily going to be discrepancies between history as one person remembers it and history as the people in the period he's posting to remember it. This is because ETP is a widespread, popular service. Lots of people use it and it remains legal because changes made to the past carry forward at a fixed rate, the hard limit that prevents those changes from 'catching up' to the present.

As a result, history according to someone from 1 year ago will probably differ noticeably from history according to someone from 10 years ago.

That's probably not the answer you want, but there it is.

>> No.1673159
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1673159

>>1673146

>> No.1673169
Quoted by: >>1673182

And before you ask, yes, that means a significant subset of the people you interact with online could be posting from some other period. Most don't announce that, however, for reasons made clear in every thread I've ever posted; it's like jumping into a pirahna tank covered in steak sauce.

>> No.1673170

>>1673146
...holy crap, you made me find out Chelsea Clinton is 30. Now I feel old. D:

>> No.1673182
Quoted by: >>1673189

>>1673169
>jumping into a piranha tank covered in steak sauce

The internet isn't usually like that already?

>> No.1673189
Quoted by: >>1673197 >>1673198

>>1673182

I guess in 2010, yeah. Not so much anymore. Stream monitors and panopticon make for better manners all around.

>> No.1673197
File: 10 KB, 429x410, 1272502660133.png [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1673197
Quoted by: >>1673238

>>1673189
>Stream monitors and panopticon

>> No.1673198

>>1673189
What's the eventual culmination of the war for IP control?

>> No.1673214
Quoted by: >>1673229 >>1673247

>>1673146
I've always assumed post scarcity was not possible in energy markets until room temperature superconductivity is achieved. Or, at the very least, achieving it would guarantee a post scarcity energy market. Of course, that doesn't preclude other technologies from having the same effect.

Possible/Not Possible? Need it/don't need it?

What say you?

>> No.1673229
Quoted by: >>1673269

>>1673214
Once first-world (or greater) levels of wealth require a minimal amount of human labor (which is becoming more true all the time), you enter SOME sort of post-scarcity scenario. Not necessarily the utopian kind.

>> No.1673233

You know you are being trolled by a master when you genuinely question whether or not you are being trolled.

>> No.1673238
Quoted by: >>1673275 >>1673984

>>1673197

...Okay, here we go.

Stream monitors are nothing as sinister as you probably imagine. They're employees for ETP providers who are better at noticing legally questionable uses of ETP than AI. Those infractions include using ETP to contact core members of corporations which still exist and convincing them to divulge information which remains proprietary in the present day, that sort of thing. You might say "They're trying to prevent people from uncovering misconduct that is still within the statute of limitations" or something, but that's typical Singularian bullshit.

Panopticon is how we police each other. A few technologies dropped so precipitously in price over the decades following the war that they could essentially be printed as part of surface materials. Cameras, display surface and sensors included. As a result every inch of hab interiors is coated in perceptive equipment. Nobody monitors it unless there's a crime, and the police don't get involved unless someone cares enough to look through the records from the time and place the crime took place to figure out who did it. Theft isn't a huge issue since if you see something you like you can just go home, order it over habnet and it'll arrive on your doorstep in a few days but violence, typically motivated by jealousy, is still sufficiently problematic that panopticon gets a lot of use.

When the recordings of the crime are submitted to habsec and they determine a legitimate infraction has occurred, they take action. But not before. They're actually a lot less visible and involved than police are in your lives.

>> No.1673247

>>1673214

Are you talking about graphene superconductors? You're pretty close to their debut. Most components that used to employ graphene for that purpose are now reprogenetic though. Graphene/fiber is still used for reliable, secure bussing but not for processors.

>> No.1673269
Quoted by: >>1673320

>>1673229
I dunno about you, but I'm working my ass off here. Just because you're not hauling rocks doesn't mean you're not working. Really, what percentage of people, even in first-world countries, are unemployed AND have a high standard of living? It's certainly not the majority, or even a significant fraction, as you seem to imply.

>> No.1673275
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1673275
Quoted by: >>1673340

>>1673238
...This sort of sounds okay.

What year are you from anyway?
Note, I still don't believe you're from the future (unless you can give me the Oz Lotto numbers for next week) but damn you have an interesting story. And not many cracks in it.

>> No.1673299
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1673299
Quoted by: >>1673336

>>1673058
>Nuclear
>Implying that there aren't already flying saucers with no need of conventional energy sources

Op is a fraud!
That's ok, you can continue though.

>> No.1673320
Quoted by: >>1673389

>>1673269
Yeah, this. Unless a radically socialist first-world society turns up, unemployed people will always be poor relative to people who work, and they will be poor compared to people who own EVERYTHING. Everyone will get richer in absolute terms, maybe, but the divides will remain unless there's drastic change to the socioeconomic model. Technology enables change, but does not cause it.

>> No.1673336
Quoted by: >>1673434

>>1673299
>>>/x/

>> No.1673340
Quoted by: >>1674861

>>1673275

2108. I started posting to this site back before I'd graduated cumulative, in 2093. I've enlisted in Unisec since then, the privatized equivalent of your military. The state military is just a few million drones and a few thousand operators. They're earning their keep for the first time since the civil war ever since the current retaliatory war against remnant terrorists began.

>> No.1673389

>>1673320

This is absolutely correct. It took a second civil war and the near complete destruction of the north American infrastructure and economy for autolabor economics to supplant traditional capitalism.

The CNPA was as hardcore conservative and religious as it got. Their attempted revolution and inhumane tactics during the war stigmatized everything they stood for, pretty much permanently. No politician would oppose guaranteed basic income or autolabor for fear of being accused of CNPA sympathies. They both passed unanimously.

>> No.1673402

there will be no such thing as a 'post sacristy' economy till they can redistribute love, sex, and popularity.

>> No.1673419
Quoted by: >>1673439

>>1673402
I am pro-redistribution of sex.

>> No.1673425
Quoted by: >>1673471

Post-scarcity is just mixing marxism with sci-fi. Spoiler: It doesn't work that way.

>> No.1673431

>>1673402

>>love
Impressors.

>>sex
MyGirlfriends.

>>popularity
Can't help you there. Invalids don't seem to mind being at the bottom of the heap since everyone enjoys pretty much the same basic privileges.

>> No.1673434

>>1673336
>he didn't bother reading what this thread is about

>> No.1673435

In the future have you nuked Japan to smitheroons?!

Also has comrade Putin reestablished the new Soviet Union?

Also what is the status of China? Has Taiwan become their righteous slaves yet?

and what about Best Korea and Iran? Did they develop a descent nuke after all?

>> No.1673439

>>1673419
"It wasn't rape, it was sexual reparations"

>> No.1673455

What's the situation at the Balkans and Turkey?

>> No.1673456

>>1673402
the secret government spies gathering information on everyone could make a dating agency!

>> No.1673462
Quoted by: >>1673509

Tell us about the progress of space exploration, OP. =D

>eagerly awaiting story time with blanky and warm chocolate milk =o>

>> No.1673467
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1673467

kinda liek this thread

>> No.1673471
Quoted by: >>1673501 >>1675101

>>1673425

>>Post-scarcity is just mixing marxism with sci-fi. Spoiler: It doesn't work that way.

I've heard it called everything from communism to an objectivist's paradise, for different reasons.

Our own economists consider it 'democratically enforced benign corporatism'. GBI entitles every citizen to some share in the industrial exploitation of natural resources. As a result, corporations survive by providing for a captive audience of consumers; corporation builds cohab, provided you own even a single share you're entitled to a residence, and everything you buy in that cohab is made by the parent company. It's a mutually beneficial symbiosis. The nearest example I know of was the practice of companies issuing their own currency during the industrial revolution, currency good only at the "company store". This kept the money flowing back in, and employees got more for their labor.

The state remains in place to enforce this arrangement by maintaining a perpetual patrol of air, ground and sea drones. Formerly used to police the middle east, they now serve to guarantee corporate cooperation under the 'new' model.

>> No.1673492
Quoted by: >>1673555

>>1673389
>It took a second civil war and the near complete destruction of the north American infrastructure and economy for autolabor economics to supplant traditional capitalism.

What happened to:
Australia
Sweden
Canada

In this period of civil war?

>> No.1673498

OK, please stop dropping acronyms without saying what they stand for

>> No.1673501

>>1673471
>implying I'm going to respond to someone pretending to be from the future.

>> No.1673504
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1673504

>>1673389
>The CNPA was as hardcore conservative and religious as it got
have they managed to purge the scourge corrupting North America before they were overthrown?

>> No.1673509

>>1673462

Virgin Bigelow is currently in the process of retiring all but one pulse drive ferry. The program is considered a mixed bag; a success because it provided several decades of reliable interplanetary travel and a failure because the wear and tear on the superstructure caused by the powerful vibration from the pulse drives meant that most ferries lasted about 2/3rds as long as initially promised.

All replacements built since use the lightbulb drive. The reason they're keeping a single pulse drive ferry in operation is because it has a much higher potential top speed, and it's scheduled to be sent to the nearest star as a probe. The trip will take about 45 years.

>> No.1673555
Quoted by: >>1673605

>>1673492

Australia volunteered the outback as a testbed for early autolabor compounds. Proof of concept stuff, funded mainly by a consortium including Google, ABB and Yaskawa.

Sweden and Canada are both part of the new breadbasket, along with Russia, as a result of rapid warming. It's unknown whether or not global warming would've eventually had the same effect. Rapid warming was the result of botched attempts to slow or halt climate change. Several nations enacted their own corrective programs without sufficient communication and although everyone points the finger at everyone else and it's uncertain as to whose project caused the RWE, the end result was a sudden spike in global temperature that has only just begun to plateau. Desertification of north America was counteracted by the spread of reprogenetic fauna, but that wound up turning most of north America into subtropical jungle.

We've made a bit of a mess of the place, in other words.

>> No.1673605
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1673605

>>1673555
YOOOOOOOUUU

>> No.1673612
Quoted by: >>1673629

BTW, don't move into any "eco villages" you hear about. They are a fad. Most supported themselves attempting to farm crops for biodiesel which turned out to be a dead end, and they were largely abandoned during the war, then grown-over as a result of the warming.

But man, for a brief period people seemed to think they were a sure bet.

>> No.1673629
Quoted by: >>1673633

>>1673612
Name some famous people from your time period, then.

>> No.1673633
Quoted by: >>1673634 >>1673636

>>1673629

Still living, or deceased?

>> No.1673634

>>1673633
how old is the oldest person?

>> No.1673636
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1673636
Quoted by: >>1673643

>>1673633
A bit of both perhaps?

>> No.1673643
Quoted by: >>1673646

>>1673636

Robert Bussard, Jacques Fresco, Gerard Silverton, James Maynard, Dorian Bluss, Mick Mountz, Marshall Brain, Kurt Vonnegut, Burt Rutan

>> No.1673646
File: 5 KB, 350x346, 1272063417593.png [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1673646
Quoted by: >>1673652

>>1673643
>Marshall Brain
>Jacques Fresco

>> No.1673647

Oh, can't forget Ron Mallet and whoever invented the plasma wakefield accelerator. If not for them I wouldn't be writing this.

>> No.1673652
Quoted by: >>1673664

>>1673646

You know of them? Their books are required reading in entry level econ classes, along with Vonnegut's "player piano".

>> No.1673664
Quoted by: >>1673682

>>1673652
http://www.marshallbrain.com/manna1.htm
http://www.thevenusproject.com/

>> No.1673682

>>1673664

Yeah! I remember having to write tedious essays about what Fresco, Brain and Vonnegut got wrong. Apprehensions about how autolabor would work versus how it played out, personal reflection, that sort of thing.

I got in minor trouble for pointing out that invalids have somewhat legitimized vonnegut's predictions. The professor was sensitive to criticism of invalids as I believe his parents were living on guaranteed basic income at the time.

>> No.1673722
Quoted by: >>1673852

Shit, my CO needs something. I'll be back in a bit.

>> No.1673759

Cool, in the future, does /x/ still exist? Because maybe you should go there for this shit

>> No.1673767
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1673767
Quoted by: >>1673878

What about extraterrestrial life, OP!

>> No.1673852

>>1673722
OMG HES GOING TO COME BACK AND TELL US ABOUT SOME CRAZY FUTURE SHIT THATS GOING DOWN.

I liken it to harry potter, it may or may not be real but i dont care as long as its kept churning out to feed my escapism.

Im going to go play colonization for a while and check this thread later.
I got 3 assessments due at uni this fortnight.

>> No.1673872

Future is the best tripfag I've seen in a while.

>> No.1673878

K back, a tree was tangled up in the tread. Iron Hill wasn't made for plow through forests.

>>1673767

Multiple species of microbes discovered on Mars, as well as Europa and other icy moons. The public got over it pretty fast, mainly because the sort of people who would've raised a stink about it for theological reasons were no longer among us.

>> No.1673903
Quoted by: >>1673907

Oh and btw, stop killing dolphins. They're higher order beings, tool users, and closer to human intelligence than chimps. And you fuckin' eat them for some reason.

>> No.1673907
Quoted by: >>1673921

>>1673903
That would be the Japanese. You're preaching to the choir if you tell us they're weirdos.

>> No.1673921

>>1673907

Oh. Well stop 'em, anyways. Dolphins and higher order apes meet the criteria for personhood and some of Unisec's best soldiers are nonhuman.

You might say they are "bros".

>> No.1673931

When did Bob Dylan die?

More importantly, when did he finally stop touring?

>> No.1673935

>>1673019
what are you doing now? I'm considering economics as a major

>> No.1673976

bump.

>> No.1673984
Quoted by: >>1674009

>>1673238
All that you typed right there, Mr. future, doesn't make sense.

It's like you are doing that thin that the Star Trek writers did when they made up shit like Phaser or Teleportation machine. We all new it was made up shit but it sure sounded good and official.

That gave you away and also your "buddy" with the stick figure pics (in other words-you). Interesting how every time you throw one of those bizare or says something most of us would say, "Uh, what did he just say?" and then all of a sudden some anon with cutesy stick figure pic asks about that specific term, or whatever you said, for clarification.

Anyway, very creative anyway. You definitely have a gift for the BS therefore you will make a great fictional writer! gratz

>> No.1674009
Quoted by: >>1674047 >>1674049

>>1673984

If there's something you'd like clarified, ask. I never promised it'd make perfect sense but I think most of it's pretty self explanatory.

As for the stick figure images I remember exactly one, and I didn't draw it. If your own monitors have some way of differentiating between users you can ask them to confirm that.

>> No.1674047
Quoted by: >>1674252

>>1674009
Ask who? Who is them? And you should know since we are on an `~Anonymous~ board that I cannot tell who posted what unless they have an id that is visible like you, Mr. future.

Anyway, I have nothing to ask because I don't believe you are from the future, for one, and since you only predict the future I don't see the point as I wouldn't be able to verify that you are telling the truth until later and that is not good enough. But thanks for asking anyway.

>> No.1674049
Quoted by: >>1674068 >>1674073

>>1674009
When is the housing market going to improve?

>> No.1674063
Quoted by: >>1674072

If you eliminate wants and focus solely on needs and heavily rely on renewables, suddenly we're already living in a potential post-scarcity world.

>> No.1674068

>>1674049
why would it? and what does improve mean?

at least here in america, we are very sparsely populated. that, combined with a low birthrate, low immigration rate and a SURPLUS of housing means that its not going to 'improve'. well, it will stabilize to something sane, but you won't get your money that you lost in the bubble...

>> No.1674069

Economics is so full of bullshit. There's no way to reproduce conditions and results in the real world.

>> No.1674072

>>1674063
if everyone lived like ultralight hikers, mankind would be set

>> No.1674073 [DELETED] 
Quoted by: >>1674076

>>1674049

Never. The war's in 2016. Airports, malls and business towers are used to house refugees. This works out so well that they remain in use, becoming the first cohabs; large scale multi-zone indoor cities. More efficient to heat and cool, no need to own a car or have any meaningful transit system except between cohabs, and most could be powered entirely by on-site wind and solar.

It fit in nicely with autolabor since living in habs made distribution of produce simpler to automate, and when vertical farming towers proved their worth, many were integrated into newer habs to feed the residents.

>> No.1674076
Quoted by: >>1674078 >>1674089

>>1674073
so do we have medbots too?

cause like... cohab cities with free food and shit

lots of sex

>> No.1674078
Quoted by: >>1674085 >>1674107

>>1674076

Medical care is mostly robotic, yes. But it's the MyGirlfriends you'd want for sex.

You could try to fuck a robotic surgeon, but I don't think that would end well.

>> No.1674085
Quoted by: >>1674104

>>1674078
What if I want to fuck a human?

Really, I mean, If I don't have to work a job or pay for anything I guess I could put up with a Bitch's shit.

>> No.1674089

>>1674076

Are you thinking of sexy robotic nurses or something? lol.

>> No.1674104
Quoted by: >>1674107

>>1674085

In my time there are robotic whores and companion robots for that.

>> No.1674107

>>1674078
>>1674104

Hey. Make your own thread.

>> No.1674109
Quoted by: >>1674131

whats the point in studying economics in post scarcity? And also, while ultimately its unachievable, if it were why would anyone oppose it?

>> No.1674111

Room for both of us, bro. You don't get to be the only future dude. :3

>> No.1674113
Quoted by: >>1674155

>>1672987
>>1673002
>>1672856
>>1672819
>>1672799
>>OP
samefag

>> No.1674131
Quoted by: >>1674159

>>1674109

>>whats the point in studying economics in post scarcity?

The same reason you study your own government and economic system. Because you're expected to understand it, and some go on to teach others.

>>And also, while ultimately its unachievable, if it were why would anyone oppose it?

On the grounds that it constitutes socialism, and fulfills prophesies concerning the end times. Same reason why the devoutly religious refused to move into the habs. They had some ideology (which is still around apparently, among outsiders) that convinced them that cohabs, implants, autolabor and so on were part of a demonic plot leading up to a cataclysmic battle between the good and evil deities of their religion.

>> No.1674147

Futurobro, What ever happened to Dome Guy or Konata Izumi? Seems like none of the veterans who frequented the old threads are still around.

>> No.1674155

>>1674113

Nobody who has ever done this has been right. For pretty simple reasons, too.

>> No.1674159
Quoted by: >>1674166

>>1674131
without scarcity thats not much of a class

also did you say earlier that resources are infinite? how exactly did you manage to break the laws of physics are we currently understand them ?

>> No.1674166
Quoted by: >>1674178

>>1674159

>>also did you say earlier that resources are infinite? how exactly did you manage to break the laws of physics are we currently understand them ?

No, I said the exact opposite. Me, from earlier:

>>"Autolabor isn't true post scarcity, it's just called that. Resources are still finite, it's only that labor is fully automated and there's a continual effort to find substitute materials so that when one resource runs out we can seamlessly switch to the next. Bioplastics are a good example of this."

I know you're a cavebro but for fuck's sake you can at least read, I hope

>> No.1674172
Quoted by: >>1674192

so, does the community use ETP to communicate with the future beyond your own existing timeline for obvious reasons?
and how frequently do people watch porn from the early 21st century

>> No.1674178

>>1674166

ok sorry i was just skimming through your bullshit

>> No.1674192

>>1674172

Posting forward is legally prevented. It's speculated that the state and parent companies have programs that engage in it but I've heard equally convincing claims that it's fundamentally impossible. That's the line from ETP providers anyway, that the technology doesn't actually allow that, but that doesn't explain why there would exist laws against it.

We do get people on habnet claiming to be from further ahead, though. But, very conspicuously, never anyone who claims to be from the past. The conspiracy theorists insist that's because stream monitors censor those posts, but there's no way they'd get them all, and someone would have inevitably recorded and publicized such an instance by now.

>> No.1674196
Quoted by: >>1674216

Fuck, it's FutureBro! I remember being the first person pretending to have another time-radio.

>> No.1674216
Quoted by: >>1674245

>>1674196

>>pretending
>>time radio

I wish I could post a reaction image.

>> No.1674228
Quoted by: >>1674242

>>1674192

You realize that the problem is the equipment in the past is incompatible with the future's equipment? I'm sure someone out there still uses 300-baud modems for something, but they're not so good at accessing future quantum entangled states.

>> No.1674242
Quoted by: >>1674272

>>1674228

Yeah, I realize. The ETP provider handles conversion into period appropriate protocols, and they are received on your end as what looks to your equipment like cellular, microwave or satellite transmissions. That's the point of entry into your networks.

>> No.1674245

>>1674216
For real, I think I started talking about how there was weird stuff going on near your sector that you ought to get checked out. You were off duty and screwing around with the time radio. Fun times.

>> No.1674252

>>1674047
You can do something to find out whos samefagging, theres extended anon names and theres some function that you throw in email field that makes the long names appear with some sort of unique code that you can use to see samefagging.

Theres one of those picture guides but im posting off my iphone on the toilet so i dont have it.

Also time to wipe, goodbye.

>> No.1674258

Are there any archives of Futurebro threads? I want to read more.

>> No.1674263
File: 41 KB, 468x425, 1281592731665.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1674263
Quoted by: >>1674273

>>1674192
Fundamental flaws, eh?
You could always come back tomorow (your time) and tell yourself something you wish you knew before tomorow right now in this thread.

I'm guessing there's no such thing as lottery in your time, eh.

>> No.1674272
Quoted by: >>1674280 >>1674490

>>1674242
Yes, but the equipment used in the 80's for geeks creating a BBS is completely incompatible with the equipment used to access the internet 20 years later.

Besides, posting from the past creates a collapsed wave-function effect around the concerned series of events in the future, in much the same way that observing a photon collapses it's wave function.

Time-t eventually returns to normal behavior, but not after an unavoidable series of events.

>> No.1674273

>>1674263

I could, but with no guarantee that what I told myself was accurate, for this reason: >>1673146

ETP also does not allow session overlap. But again, I don't own a provider. I'm not an expert on how they work any more than you could tell me exactly what running an ISP entails.

>> No.1674280
Quoted by: >>1674316

>>1674272

And yet, you can emulate the computers used at the time and you could, if necessary, write software to communicate with them.

While the software and computers changed dramatically, the means of communication didn't. Electrical and photonic impulses, supplemented by microwave and radio towers as well as satellites. All the ETP provider needs to know is what format the receiving dish/antennae expects. It's not as though knowledge of what communication protocols were used prior to the war has been lost, yenno.

>> No.1674316
Quoted by: >>1674357

>>1674280

You're still not grasping the nature of the problem. You know what systems we used. The past has to guess.

You might be able to send a message from 5-10 years in the past. That's about the best range you can expect until net protocols become more permanently standardized. I know how to chat on a past BBS in the 80's, and I can set up my equipment to do this. They cannot set up a 8-bit computer to communicate using 2020 protocols.

>> No.1674339

This thread is fucking retarded, take it back to /x/.

>> No.1674348
Quoted by: >>1674384

Hmm, I FutureGuy thread in /sci/, with half as many trolls as the recent /r9k/ threads.

I guess I'll ask about the fab invasion you talked about before when the giant mech showed up and rained death on everything. Do you have any more deets on that.

Also, fuckin magnets. How do they work?

PPS: To anyone in this thread, where is futurebros repository of threads, I can't find it anywhere.

>> No.1674357
Quoted by: >>1674490

>>1674316

Ah, I see what you're saying. And perhaps that's a legitimate reason why posting to future networks is impossible. But I'm not posting from your past. I'm posting from well ahead of you, and as a result enough is known about period protocols that all of this is possible.

If you read >>1674192 more carefully, you'll see that we don't (and supposedly cannot) post to future dates. There are various concpisracy theories surrounding whether or not it's actually impossible, and some allege that it is but it's done as part of secret state or corporate programs, but the official line is that it can't be done. I've never heard anyone offer the reason you have, but it seems as sensible as any other.

>> No.1674384

>>1674348

>>I guess I'll ask about the fab invasion you talked about before when the giant mech showed up and rained death on everything. Do you have any more deets on that.

Iron Hill? It's an amphibious assault carrier. Fancy Unisec label for "really big tank with submarine-like capabilities". Lots of independent turrets on the various tiers but nothing resembling legs, or arms, or a head. That'd be awesome but I don't think the proposal would pass review.

It was originally a secret project, but the cat's out of the bag now. In passing by habs we've picked up habnet traffic, some of which is newsapps showing aerial video of Iron Hill plodding through the jungle. Everyone outside of Unisec seems to be speculating wildly about what it is and what it's for, none of them have it right though.

I didn't know at first either, then I visited the drill room. There's a massive drilling rig built into the bottom few decks. The idea is that Iron Hill settles over the suspected location of an underground outsider stronghold (usually built in abandoned mines) drills a vertical shaft, then lowers a nuclear charge. The shaft is then filled up with a dense bioplastic foam (very compressible, we can carry loads of it in a small space) so they can't dig it out in time. When Iron Hill is several miles away, the charge detonates and caves in the entire colony.

That's the theory of it anyway, we have yet to deploy any charges.

>> No.1674397
Quoted by: >>1674411

>herp derp I are from futuar
>I cannot into proof
>because I are derp
>gib attencions pls
>plis?

>> No.1674411

>>1674397

Prove you're from the past. :P

>> No.1674416
File: 177 KB, 434x800, 1283066208583.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1674416
Quoted by: >>1674452

Hey futureguy, I remember you back in the /v/ days. Two things you have predicted that will happen soon are: ID sofware's rage will be released, and obama will be shot in the shoulder. Still stand by those broski?

>> No.1674417

The mistake you make is that you're too impressed by your own timeframe. It shows in your tone. Also, your reckless disregard for spacetime continuity.

>> No.1674452

>>1674416

See: >>1673146

You might (and probably will) conclude that I'm full of shit. I won't blame you. Even so, I am nothing if not internally consistent.

>> No.1674490
Quoted by: >>1674511 >>1674550

>>1674357

Yes, but see where I posted: >>1674272

That means posting from the near past fixes events in the near term. Us replying to you does not effect your time-frame. Your posting to yourself 5 years in the past, AND THEN RECEIVING THE REPLY collapses the wave-function of causality where several probable events might simultaneously occur. You will not notice the collapsed causality, and you cannot avoid it, either.

>> No.1674511

>>1674490
tl;dr: You collapse the wave function of the universe, when it is normal for it to be effected by, and interact with, surrounding universes.

>> No.1674550
Quoted by: >>1674610 >>1674613

>>1674490

I understand what you're saying, but it's evidently not the case, or I couldn't send you the message you're reading right now. Are you willing to permit the possibility that there are aspects of time and of particle physics not yet understood in 2010?

>> No.1674571
Quoted by: >>1674587 >>1674599

Not to break the illusion but this shit is fucking gold. Future, you have an excellent writing style. Best thread I have read in ages. Do this more.

ARCHIVE THIS SHIT.

>> No.1674587
File: 14 KB, 476x373, 1282038056020.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1674587
Quoted by: >>1674607

>>1674571
This. Write a book. I'll read it. I won't even pirate it.

>> No.1674599

>>1674571
>Future, you have an excellent writing style.
tripfag.licks.his.own.balls.avi.exe

>> No.1674607

>>1674587

People who claim to know him IRL have confirmed that he does this as a way of searching his plot for inconsistencies. He's supposedly writing either a book or screenplay.

Of course it could just be someone looking to discredit futurebro so he has to deal with it in his next thread. Pre-emptive trollan.

>> No.1674610 [DELETED] 

>>1674550
The "reduction of the wave packet" eventually returns to normal slight quantum decoherence that space exists in as it interacts with other probabilities in other universes. However, if you interact with nearby time-frames you create a "fixed path" that you cannot avoid until the Dirac delta function of probability reasserts itself on your timeframe

Seriously, You're supposed to be talking from 90 years in the future, not 5 years in the past.

>> No.1674613
Quoted by: >>1674639

>>1674550
The "collapse of the state vector" eventually returns to normal slight quantum decoherence that space exists in as it interacts with other probabilities in other universes. However, if you interact with nearby time-frames you create a "fixed path" that you cannot avoid until the Dirac delta function of probability reasserts itself on your timeframe

Seriously, You're supposed to be talking from 90 years in the future, not 5 years in the past.

>> No.1674633

Go back to /r9k/.

>> No.1674639

>>1674613

Well, then I'm at a loss. Being from 98 years in the future doesn't make me omniscient. I dunno why ETP works, but apparently it does.

If it helps, ETP is a direct product of research originally conducted by Ron Mallet. Modern ETP transceivers use plasma wakefield accelerators to fire one half of a pair of entangled electrons or photons into a tight orbit around a microsingularity. While the laser transceiver Mallet envisioned was a dead end, the frame dragging principles it relied on indirectly led to the discovery of a similar method using most of the same components his prototypes did.

>> No.1674658 [DELETED] 

>>1674639

I'm saying that a distant communication has no effect on your timeframe. A communication with nearby timeframes causes problems with YOUR timeframe.

You said it yourself, you don't post to your younger self, and you don't post to the future. The past is already fucked as it can get, and your communication/correspondence with us harms your timeframe not one whit. Any problems caused by your posts gets normalized by the Dirac delta function of probable events. You could tell us everything that will happen over the next 100 years, and it will change NOTHING.

>> No.1674659

Thread still alive? I have some questions.

>> No.1674661

>>1674639
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronald_Mallett

>> No.1674662 [DELETED] 

>>1674639

I'm saying that a distant communication/correspondence has no effect on your timeframe. A communication with nearby timeframes causes problems with YOUR timeframe.

You said it yourself, you don't post to your younger self, and you don't post to the future. The past is already fucked as it can get, and your communication/correspondence with us harms your timeframe not one whit. Any problems caused by your posts gets normalized by the Dirac delta function of probable events. You could tell us everything that will happen over the next 100 years, and it will change NOTHING.

>> No.1674665
Quoted by: >>1674692

>>1674639

I'm saying that a distant correspondence has no effect on your timeframe. A communication with nearby timeframes causes problems with YOUR timeframe.

You said it yourself, you don't post to your younger self, and you don't post to the future. The past is already fucked as it can get, and your communication/correspondence with us harms your timeframe not one whit. Any problems caused by your posts gets normalized by the Dirac delta function of probable events. You could tell us everything that will happen over the next 100 years, and it will change NOTHING.

>> No.1674670
File: 116 KB, 1024x640, konata kagami.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1674670
Quoted by: >>1674675 >>1674692

Having read the thread, I find you (Future) obliquely referring to individual monetary resources in a post scarcity environment.
So does this imply that a post-capitalist environment isn't necessarily hostile to individual accumulation of capital?
Help, I don't understand how a post-scarcity society could operate with intact monetary functioning at any level.

>> No.1674675

>>1674670
I think what he's saying is there is so much of everything to be made, that there is no price on it. Just like there is no price on seawater or the air we breathe.

>> No.1674682

Hey futurebro. I always enjoy your threads, regardless of whether or not they are true. Tell me, who would you say are some of the great thinkers of the 21st century? Also, what do you think of the recapatcha verification that is now on 4chan? I fucking hate it.

>> No.1674683
Quoted by: >>1674687

Here's a test Future. Does the name Terrence Crawford ring bells?

>> No.1674687

>>1674683
that name sure rings some balls. because it is so gay.

>> No.1674692
Quoted by: >>1674713 >>1674723

>>1674665

You've got it. There turns out to be no such thing as a grandfather paradox as a result, something that will make headlines shortly or which already has. There's a lot about time you don't know yet.

>>1674670

Autolabor is not a replacement for capitalism, it's more like a foundation upon which a new capitalism was built. Everyone gets GBI, basically a monthly allowance called a dispensation or stipend, and that's good for any product of autolabor. This includes food, rent, clothes, that sort of thing.

However, nothing stops people from setting up shop and selling custom made goods or personal services that cannot be mass produced. What they get in return are stipend dollars. This increases their per-month buying power.

Every cohab has it's own currency, and exchange rates do vary from hab to hab, but they all serve the same purpose; to regulate consumption so that it never overwhelms production capacity. When people run their own business, they wind up getting more than the share of autolabor produce than they're entitled to, but the person who pays them gets less (recieving some unique product or service instead) so the overall balance for that hab remains the same.

Those who have never run a business or worked for one are called invalids. There's undeniably a certain stigma attached to those who feed off of GBI and never aspire to anything more. I don't know how much that factors into peoples' motivation to produce, though; I've written for a couple of different publications, and I didn't do it because I was afraid of being considered invalid, I did it because I love to write and the extra income fueled my habit of taking several vacations per month.

>> No.1674713
Quoted by: >>1674740

>>1674692
Im gonna try to keep this as simple as possible.

So the system sounds rather autocratic.
Who determines exchange rates and law?
Are saying monetary incentive research changed direction entirely from the current curve showing said incentive is a hinderance on creativity and innovation?
Can you travel freely, and in pre-fabricated "habs", why is rent an issue/requirement?

>> No.1674723
Quoted by: >>1674731

>>1674692
>There's a lot about time you don't know yet.

I swear to you, if you ever call me an uninformed person again, I'll rape your wife in 2 months from your current timeframe. Not even joking.

>> No.1674731
File: 23 KB, 428x336, 1272611649574.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1674731
Quoted by: >>1674830

>>1674723

>> No.1674740
Quoted by: >>1674762

>>1674713

>>So the system sounds rather autocratic.

I've gotten that before. And the opposite, from different people. It seems to sound, to various groups, like whatever economic and governmental model they most fear.

>>Who determines exchange rates and law?

The people. There is still a democratically elected government, and the value of various goods in any given hab has mainly to do which products it's autolabor compound puts out. A seastead hab which farms fish, crustaceans, seaweed and so on will have an understandably low local price for those goods but if you live in a different hab inland the price will be higher.

>>Are saying monetary incentive research changed direction entirely from the current curve showing said incentive is a hinderance on creativity and innovation?

If I understand your meaning correctly, no. Part of the rationale forwarded by early supporters of autolabor was that providing comfortably for peoples' needs would free them to pursue their passions, without having to work an unrelated job to pay the bills.

>>Can you travel freely, and in pre-fabricated "habs", why is rent an issue/requirement?

Travel yes, but emigrating from one hab to the next is a tedious process. Not materially since you can just re-buy all your old belongings for the new residence, but converting currency, recertifying if you run a business, transferring your public profile and education transcripts and so on is a fuckin' nightmare. I should know, I've done it twice.

>> No.1674751
Quoted by: >>1674760

Do people still play hockey in the future? If not, when do we stop?

Also, was Bin Laden ever caught?

>> No.1674760

>>1674751

#1. yes, although overly complex simulations of sports are more popular than actual sports

#2. Not alive.

>> No.1674762
Quoted by: >>1674788

>>1674740
Sounds... almost exactly like the current primary economic system, minus the "disgraceful" safety net (forgot the abbreviations u used).
This is kinda fun tho, so what the hell-

>Part of the rationale forwarded by early supporters of autolabor was that providing comfortably for peoples' needs would free them to pursue their passions, without having to work an unrelated job to pay the bills.
So how did this play out?

Also, it seems reasonable to assume that this autolabor is privately owned intellectual property. I infer from this such ownership would create a global monopoly. Are corporations intimately enmeshed with the government, and if not, then whats the relationship?

>> No.1674765
Quoted by: >>1674772

What's the global ethnic breakdown of the future? I mean how many percent are white, black, asian, mixed.

>> No.1674768

yes. the second downfall is gonna be great. it will sow the seeds for extropian revolution. this shit is crap tho, autolabor? try self replicating manufacture, if you are from the future you got stiffed my friend, true post scarcity cannot abide capitalism

>> No.1674772
Quoted by: >>1674793 >>1674801

>>1674765
Europe is gonna be filled with muslims. Feels bad, man.

>> No.1674786

What percentage of the 2010 population of earth exists in your time? We have 6 billion people, more or less.

Totaling up all the habs, how many people exist in your time?

>> No.1674788

>>1674762

>>So how did this play out?

Depends who you ask. Invalids are privately considered a huge social problem by most, although it's not acceptable to be open about it. In some habs upwards of 70% of residents are invalids. This percentage usually increases over time as those motivated to produce flee invalid-heavy habs to be with other motivated types.

>>Also, it seems reasonable to assume that this autolabor is privately owned intellectual property. I infer from this such ownership would create a global monopoly. Are corporations intimately enmeshed with the government, and if not, then whats the relationship?

Corporations are permitted to own autolabor compounds provided they have also constructed and continually manage one hab. What they gain from the arrangement is permanence; those at the top got to continue to enjoy the lifestyle to which they were accustomed provided they complied with the law. It also offered them a security/stability that must've appealed to them in the aftermath of a recession.

So the remaining corporations are pretty much permanent, cemented into the American landscape so long as they uphold their end of the bargain. The state enforces the arrangement with a small army of drones, something corporations could not legally manufacture until Unisec was formed as a response to the attack on Citihab. There's concern as to whether or not those drones will be decommissioned following the end of hostilities, but it's mostly Singularian fearmongering.

>> No.1674793

>>1674772
>Europe is gonna be filled with muslims. Feels bad, man.
You must be from /int/

>> No.1674801
Quoted by: >>1674816

>>1674772

>>Europe is gonna be filled with muslims. Feels bad, man.

Actually, uh...not so much. I'd rather not talk about that. :-\

>> No.1674809
Quoted by: >>1674818

Do you send these messages back to us in a linear time wise manner? I mean, are you moving forward in time with us, or if you sent something back to 2007, yesterday and 2015 tomorrow.

>> No.1674816
Quoted by: >>1674821

>>1674801

Did someone come up with a solution to their presence? ;)

>> No.1674818

>>1674809

It's been mostly linear, although about 15 years have gone by for me while I've posted over a two year period from your perspective.

>> No.1674821
Quoted by: >>1674825

>>1674816

They were moved. Most historians agree that it was a mutually beneficial decision.

>> No.1674822
Quoted by: >>1674827

I REMEMBER YOU FROM /v/.

You said Shigeru Miyamoto would die in 2036 or thereabouts.

Do we know what Dark Matter and Dark Energy are yet?

>> No.1674825

>>1674821

While removing the rot is an important first step, the question of what causing the rot must be addressed.

>> No.1674827
Quoted by: >>1674850 >>1674922

>>1674822

The only astrophysics I understand is what I had to learn in order to write reports on the science being done back at the voider facility. I can tell you all about negative gravitational energy, virtual particle pairs, quantum potential and heim fields but I didn't have occasion to learn much about dark matter/energy. I'm familiar with the concept though.

>> No.1674830

>>1674731
I masturbate to irrational number porn. Don't fuck with me.

>> No.1674850
Quoted by: >>1674887 >>1674888

>>1674827
I am thinking of going into astrophysics; tell me some fascinating future discoveries if you want to.
Also I was wondering, you say 15 years have passed for you while 2 have passed for us. How much time has passed for you over the course of this thread?

>> No.1674861

>>1673389
>>1673340
Guess this means none of us are gonna be around to see it.

>> No.1674865
Quoted by: >>1675014

There's no way that language hasn't changed in that amount of time, so throw some 90-years-from-now slang at us, Future Guy.

>inb4 goram

>> No.1674879

Did we ever find out what the deal was with Magic Johnson?

Dude just wizardly basketball powers away'd his AIDS man

>> No.1674887

>>1674850

He can post for 8 hours at a time.

>> No.1674888
Quoted by: >>1674895

>>1674850

Heim theory is unexpectedly vindicated in the course of investigating the big bang, but attempted application of that theory results in disaster.

One of the predicted applications of intense heim fields is the manipulation of local gravity. This works as expected, although the effect isn't sufficiently strong to make it a practical means of lifting cargo into space for instance.

The second predicted effect was that, once the field becomes sufficiently powerful, it will bump local matter (as well as the emitter) "up and out" of local space into some region perpendicular to normal space where the laws of physics differ.

There was a great deal of excitement surrounding that prediction. Many bet their careers on it. It was popularly believed, due to preliminary data, that because the speed of light was considerably faster in this region that if you could suspend a vessel "up and out" of local space while you accelerated, you could reach speeds many times that of local C without using nearly as much energy as it normally takes an Earth-Mars ferry to reach a small fraction of C.

>> No.1674893
Quoted by: >>1674899

This did not pan out as expected. The first 'jump' was attempted when I was still in school. The ferry did not come back in one piece. It came back as an intensely powerful explosion, broken down to it's constituent subatomic particles. Somehow being thrust up into that 'other' space completely negated the strong force holding it's atoms together and converted much or all of it to energy.

Needless to say this was a depressing outcome, initially. The prospect of faster than light space travel, which had seemed all but assured before the test, had once again darted out of our grasp. Virgin Bigelow's response was to vow to send a traditional pulse drive ferry to the nearest star anyway, even though it would be a 45 year trip.

The upside of the result is that it made the voider possible, and it's looking increasingly likely that if we can safely harness the conversion process, we'll be able to use it as a power source, one that will accept any form of matter as fuel and which will return an enormous surplus of energy per gram of 'fuel'.

>> No.1674895

>>1674888
Based on you diction, I am gonna guess that the whole "hyperspace" deal ended up not working out.

>> No.1674899

>>1674893
Thats pretty cool, I keep that in mind after I become an astrophysicist.

>> No.1674905
Quoted by: >>1674920

>>OP
How did you get left behind by the singularity in ~2030?

>> No.1674920
Quoted by: >>1674934 >>1674952

>>1674905

Lol, Singularians.

Go hand out pamphlets in the dining plaza or something. I'm sure the dancing and singing will convince someone to come to your services. There's a fool born every minute, after all.

>> No.1674922
Quoted by: >>1674940

>>1674827

Explain Heim Fields and negative gravitational energy if you will, I presume they're related?

>> No.1674934

>>1674920
So people who believe in the singularity in your time are akin to the hare krishna and other weirdos of my time?

>> No.1674937
File: 40 KB, 640x640, 4052130709_d9dcc4ee5a_z.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1674937

Alright, so how long did it take for medical science to basically have a cure-for-everything available? [e.g. brain-computer interface, upload you into a computer if your body is hopeless, robotic augmentations, etc.]

Do people all look like people, or is there aesthetic implantation/augmentation going on at all? Are people switching bodies, woman today, child tomorrow, etc.

Or are things simply not that advanced, even 98 years into the future?

>> No.1674940
Quoted by: >>1674971

>>1674922

The short answer is that by spinning one ring made of superconducting material in a vacuum at near absolute zero you can create a gravito-electromagnetic field. By spinning two such rings adjacent to each other and modulating the distance between them so as to change the point at which the fields intersect you can manipulate gravitational energy, both negative and positive.

It just turns out to have only three practical uses: Solarnet, ETP and the voider. None of which were what we hoped it would be useful for.

>> No.1674951

Future, are there political dissidents inside the community or are there just these "outsiders" whom you are getting ready to nuke the shit out of? information on both and why they need elimination would be appreciated.

Oh and are the autolabor factories self replicating?

>> No.1674952
Quoted by: >>1674979

>>1674920
They're called "Singularitarians," not "Singularians," and Bill Gates is one of them. You chose your pseudo-future poorly.

>> No.1674960

What else do you feel like talking about, futurebro?

>> No.1674964

What happens to tabletop games (Eg. Dungeons & Dragons, Nobilis, Unknown Armies, World of Darkness) in the future?

>> No.1674965

Does Eliezer Yudkowsky get famous in your time frame? What is the state of AI?

>> No.1674971

>>1674940
Where's the third ring? And the stream of photons fired through the interface that allows you to make accurate adjustments/manipulations to their speed and position?

Oh, wait. You'll discover that in 20 years. I forgot this board is in the pre-teens of the twenty-first century. Never-mind.

>> No.1674975

How much have the seas risen? What parts of the earth flood the most? Where do the displaced people go?

>> No.1674979
Quoted by: >>1674986 >>1675014

>>1674952

>>They're called "Singularitarians," not "Singularians," and Bill Gates is one of them. You chose your pseudo-future poorly.

Hahahaha! OOOOH BUTTHURT SINGULARIAN IS BUTTHURT

Guess what? There is no "quantum computing substrate" underlying the universe, and "the Kurzweil" didn't upload his mind to it when he died, he JUST FUCKING DIED. I can show you his body on ice in the golden hall. Which he didn't deserve to be interred in, by the way.

Why don't you go get another shitty prosthetic limb added, maybe you can use it to jerk yourself off while you continue to type angrily at me. Remember you use your own tears as lube.

Your religion has technically not killed anyone (yet) but everyone notices how Singularians don't condemn the Chridom remnant terrorists, they didn't condemn the Citihab attack and when you ask them about the redshirts and the CNPA they start fucking equivocating, like there's room for a nuanced view about what was inarguably a genocide.

Almost like you sympathize with them.

>> No.1674986

>>1674979
u mad

>> No.1675014
File: 9 KB, 320x240, pnp3.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1675014
Quoted by: >>1675044

>>1674979
thanks for answering
>>1674865 for me

>mfw future people talk like gay retardeds.

>> No.1675031
File: 57 KB, 646x536, csagan.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1675031
Quoted by: >>1675081

A still more glorious drive awaits.
Not a stardrive, but a galaxydrive.
A morning run of 400 billion suns.
One second around the Milky Way.

>> No.1675044

>>1675014

>>>mfw future people talk like gay retardeds.

Singularian spotted.

Anyway, I'm going to bed. Thanks for the entertainment, cavebros.

>> No.1675058

>>1675044
fine don't answer my question then >:|

>> No.1675079

>>1675044
>cavebros
wat

>> No.1675081
Quoted by: >>1675089

>>1675031

STAR RISE
GLAXY RISE

>> No.1675084

What has become of what is left of the mighty British Empire?

>> No.1675089

>>1675081
>implying you didn't understand that it was deliberate

>> No.1675095
Quoted by: >>1675102

>>OP
If you're from some point in the future, why do you use exactly the same grammar as us 2010 folk?

>> No.1675101

>>1673471
Has anyone established an anarchist zone at any point? I'd expect the belief that we should be free to live without nationality would become somewhat more mainstream

>> No.1675102

>>1675095

Probably for the same reason you'd learn local slang if you travelled to 1800, so you could fit in and people would understand you

>> No.1675105

I think he's gone.....

I'd like to be proven wrong though

>> No.1675122

>>1675044
Question:

If you have a quantum array at your disposal, why did you only find such a crappy trip? download trip code explorer, find "FutureGuy", and THEN I will believe you're from the future. Crappy computational ability isn't going to help your case

>> No.1675940
File: 476 KB, 886x593, 5.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1675940

If futureguy comes back....

Do your future cities look like this?

>> No.1676436
Quoted by: >>1677301

HEY FUTURE FAG ARE GAY NIGGERS PROSECUTED TO THE FULL EXTENT OF THE LAW IN THE FUTURE?

THEY SHOULD BE.

>> No.1677301

>>1676436
checkmate evolution

>>
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