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/sci/ - Science & Math


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1744947 No.1744947 [Reply] [Original] [archived.moe]

How attached are you to personal ownership of vehicles? Will you miss cars?

I'm open to questions about how transportation has changed since 2010 if you're also willing to entertain my curiosity about what it's like to have to manually steer a podcar.

>> No.1744968
Quoted by: >>1744993

Didn't you make a thread yesterday with the same picture

>> No.1744977
Quoted by: >>1744990

I like my Car but i am yet to name it.

>> No.1744978

You never answered my question from last time you son of a bitch. >:|

>> No.1744986
Quoted by: >>1745018

>>OP
I'll bite out of boredom. What year are you from and is private ownership of cars still common/legal?

>> No.1744990
Quoted by: >>1744995 >>1744997

>>1744977

>>I like my Car but i am yet to name it.

Why would you form an attachment to a product of autolabor? Or by the 2010 equivalent anyway. You know it was made almost entirely by robots and that there are millions more exactly like it right?

>> No.1744993

>>1744968

Every FutureGuy thread starts with the same picture

>>OP

Cars are fun, I guess. They can be a pain in the ass sometimes. And it's the most likely thing to kill us apart from old age, cancer, and smoking.

>> No.1744995

>>1744990
Just like people.

I still want to name it.

>> No.1744997
Quoted by: >>1745018

>>1744990

Lots of people name their mass-produced stuff

Soldiers name their rifles

Nerds name their computers

etc.

>> No.1745018
Quoted by: >>1745090

>>1744997

I mean, I've done that, but only with things other people have custom made. The shit you can't just order on habnet and have delivered the next day. Those are the possessions that mean something, because someone made it just for you.

>>1744986

Collectors living in traditional cities up north still own vintage autos. They actually have their own small autolabor compound just for mining and producing the zinc pellets to keep them running. A waste of space and energy imo, but if enough people vote for it, it gets built.

>> No.1745047
File: 159 KB, 500x664, bike.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1745047
Quoted by: >>1745064 >>1745092

>>OP
Quit using the term vehicle and automobile synonymously.
Pic related. Its a vehicle but not an automobile.

>> No.1745062
Quoted by: >>1745076

I suck at driving and car bore me. I won't miss them. Did you answer my question about NZ yesterday?

>> No.1745064
Quoted by: >>1745077

>>1745047

Can't load the pic. Well I can, but one at a time and it takes ages. What's it of?

Also, I'm sure there were many types of personal vehicle. I should probably have made a distinction but it doesn't seem important.

>> No.1745076

>>1745062

>>I suck at driving and car bore me. I won't miss them. Did you answer my question about NZ yesterday?

I did, sorry. I don't know much about New Zealand though. Nothing of earth shattering importance happened there in the last century, I guess.

>> No.1745077
Quoted by: >>1745081

>>1745064
It's a bicycle. Two wheels, manually driven by pedals and a chain attached to the wheel. More efficient than walking, slower than driving.

>> No.1745081
Quoted by: >>1745091

>>1745077

>>Two wheels, manually driven by pedals and a chain attached to the wheel

Hahaha what

>> No.1745090

>>1745018

Barely anything we own is not mass-produced either by industrial robots, Third World labourers or some combination of the two. Hell, even prestige items like Audi sedans and Rolex watches are products of mass production. Doesn't stop stop us from being fond of some of our possessions nonetheless.

Actually come to think of it, apart from cars, boats, and houses, even fancy-ass custom products are usually not given names.

>> No.1745091
Quoted by: >>1745153

>>1745081
Are you laughing at my terrible description or the silly idea?

>> No.1745092

>>1745047

Quit being a faggot.

>> No.1745094
Quoted by: >>1745100

saged, reported, hidden.

I suggest you all do the same.

>> No.1745096

A bicycle, also known as a bike, pushbike or cycle, is a pedal-driven, human-powered, single-track vehicle, having two wheels attached to a frame, one behind the other. A person who rides a bicycle is called a cyclist or a bicyclist.

From Wikipedia.

>> No.1745100
File: 65 KB, 425x450, flash6412_No Fun Allowed.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1745100

>>1745094

>> No.1745102

I think we could survive without cars, depending on circumstance. Walking is a fine mode of transportation, I enjoy driving only because I like being in motion.

>> No.1745148
Quoted by: >>1745172

So what do you actually use to get around?

>> No.1745153
Quoted by: >>1745158

>>1745091

>>Are you laughing at my terrible description or the silly idea?

Little of both. I know what a bicycle is, it's just hearing you describe it...

A lot of the gimmicky little "eco villages" that sprouted up before the war used something like a bicycle for transport. But with three wheels, a battery driven motor, and a cargo basket. "Back to the soil" types built these little communities with dedicated concrete paths for all manner of battery powered bicycle or tricycle. Cars weren't allowed, and most made their money by farming biofuel crops. The stagnant market for biofuels (as cars had begun to use batteries by that point) meant the ones not burnt to the ground during the war had to shut down shortly after.

A few still operate if you can believe it. Some people never give up on a dream.

>> No.1745158
Quoted by: >>1745200

>>1745153

A bicycle is considered a very normal thing to have in today's households, it's just convenient to have one for getting to nearby places, using routes that cars can't, and exercise.

>> No.1745172
Quoted by: >>1745196

>>1745148

>>So what do you actually use to get around?

Big question. A mixture of PRT, maglev, passenger VTOLS called rotos, and aerostats, though mainly for cruises.

Transit within habs is handled by different, funky looking personal rapid transit variants. Every company has their own design but they all use the same basic drivetrain. They have their own discrete network of tunnels that the interior is designed around so you never actually see the podcars except from outside, when they run along the outer windows.

Habs clustered close together are usually served by elevated PRT tracks, sometimes enclosed to protect against hurricanes. Habs further apart are linked by maglev, although none of the older infrastructure was usable meaning the tracks had to be put up over them, so there are only a few major lines and it's an ongoing project.

Rotos are driven by pivoting ducted fans, though early models used jet driven rotors. They were necessary for serving habs as the jungle started gobbling up North America. Habs have rooftop landing pads, making dedicated air transit hubs unnecessary, so most former airports were converted into habs themselves.

>> No.1745194
Quoted by: >>1745212

how accurate would you say Paolo Solari's concept of arcology became?

>> No.1745196

>>1745172
So, what's a typical size for a hab? I'm sure you've said this before, but I've only seen your most recent threads.

>> No.1745200

>>1745158

>>A bicycle is considered a very normal thing to have in today's households, it's just convenient to have one for getting to nearby places, using routes that cars can't, and exercise.

I figured, and they do seem like fun, but there's no place to use 'em. Beyond the 30-40 meter clear cut zone around the hab, it's dense jungle.

Open air cities pretty much exist solely because some still want them to, I guess to feel like we haven't lost the battle with rapid warming. So there's someplace we can visit where people don't live in habs, and where the air doesn't smell like shit. But they're not terribly big, and you go for the experience, so why would one want to get around quicker? What would be the hurry?

I guess priorities make the difference.

>> No.1745212
Quoted by: >>1745235 >>1745290

>>1745194

>>how accurate would you say Paolo Solari's concept of arcology became?

Not familiar. I can navigate away and find a site on it but it'll take awhile, ETP is chunky and awkward. Can you describe it?

>>So, what's a typical size for a hab? I'm sure you've said this before, but I've only seen your most recent threads.

Averages ten thousand, although some house as few as 4,000. Average square footage is around 10 million square feet.

>> No.1745235
Quoted by: >>1745243

>>1745212
"An arcology is a hyperdense city designed to maximize human interaction; maximize access to shared, cost-effective infrastructural services like water and sewage; minimize the use of energy, raw materials and land; reduce waste and environmental pollution; and allow interaction with the surrounding natural environment. Arcosanti is the prototype of the desert arcology."

>> No.1745243

>>1745235

Sounds like a hab. So how big is Arcosanti? One structure or many? How many square feet, and how many does it house?

>> No.1745290
Quoted by: >>1745300 >>1745304

>>1745212

so in the future people still use those ridiculous feet units?

>> No.1745300

>>1745290

>>so in the future people still use those ridiculous feet units?

No, but those who regularly post to periods when imperial units were common get into the habit of using them to fit in.

>> No.1745304
Quoted by: >>1745326

>>1745290

And "Meters", whatever they are.

>Beyond the 30-40 meter clear cut zone around the hab

>> No.1745325
Quoted by: >>1745362

Who was in the war?
How long was it?
Who won?

>> No.1745326

>>1745304

A meter is about three feet.

>> No.1745332
Quoted by: >>1745356

In high school, I wrote an essay about how and why cars should be phased out. That was more than a decade ago. I remember including points such as high mass to payload ratio, low theoretical efficiency of internal combustion engine, energy losses of braking, etc. Judging the score I got for it, the teacher understood none of it.

>> No.1745356
Quoted by: >>1745373

>>1745332

he stole your ideas and is probably patenting right now.

>> No.1745362

>>1745325

>Who was in the war?

The US government versus the Chridoms (Christian dominionist) historical term for the redshirts that fought under the CNPA. It developed from what you currently know as the Tea Party Movement.

>>How long was it?

Ten months.

>>Who won?

The government. Redshirts were made up of former soldiers only in part, those actually in power had no understanding of military tactics, though they seem to have believed otherwise. Redshirts were on average very young, between 16 and 24 years of age, largely a mixture of the homeschooled children of conservative Christian separatists and soldiers who had conspired to stage a coup long before the war officially broke out.

To call it a "war" is generous. It was a disorganized, incompetently managed nationwide riot. They had specific human targets (Muslims, gays, liberals, atheists, feminists, etc.) who were shot on sight even if they were only suspected of being any of those things. Two million died this way. Several million more died when the redshirts stumbled upon a shelved bioweapon called Toxo, which they released in the hopes of turning the tide of the war in their favor. Or maybe they just wanted to cause as much damage as possible on their way out. Either way, a dirty war by anyone's standards.

>> No.1745373

>>1745356
lawl, she was an old hag who gave better grades for artsy essays. It was a general paper essay. That essay did not give any serious solutions on the car problem. I only described many of the problems and why it is difficult to get rid of them.

>> No.1745435
File: 38 KB, 300x473, dirtnose.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1745435

>> It developed from what you currently know as the Tea Party Movement.

MY
FACE
WHEN

>> No.1745445
Quoted by: >>1745480

I would like to know the when and where of this new American Civil War.

>> No.1745447
Quoted by: >>1745480

Future, you're back! Where have you been all this time?

>my face when people don't remember Future

>> No.1745480

>>1745447

>>Future, you're back! Where have you been all this time?

Stuck aboard Iron Hill. Laughing at the newsapps we pick up where they speculate wildly about what it is and what it's for.

>>1745445

It's uncertain. My first posts to this site were at 2008, because I was interested in witnessing the initial reaction to Obama's electoral victory. Mainly because that's what set the ball rolling. However I said more than I should have, and clever "internet detectives" were able to locate not only my grandparents but many of the figures central to the history of the civil war. Copies of my threads were emailed to them, according to a few of you who thought you were being clever or funny. TV personality Glenn Beck was among those contacted. After that, the sequence events started to diverge from recorded history; Beck seems to have announced a joint rally with Palin, who has hinted at the possibility of joining him in a bid for presidency.

Changes are nothing /I/ need to worry about, ETP posters effect minor changes all the time and the consequences never 'catch up' to the present, but having grown attached to you guys I have to confess I'm slightly worried by the prospect that I've inadvertently hastened the war, and provided CNPA leadership with the information they need to win.

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