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/sci/ - Science & Math


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1931281 No.1931281 [Reply] [Original] [archived.moe]
Quoted by: >>1931316 >>1931385

Yeah it's me again. I'm gonna pour a drink and wait for you guys to ask questions.

>> No.1931296
Quoted by: >>1931303

When you die is it true your future ancestors zap your consciousness into a state that allows you to live forever in happiness?

>> No.1931303
Quoted by: >>1931311

>>1931296
I can't disprove it.

... but I'm also an engineer and not a mathematician, therefor, no.

>> No.1931306
Quoted by: >>1931315

So what's the deal with airfoils?

>> No.1931311

>>1931303
Maybe if you spent more time engineering Time Travelin' Craft for us simple folk instead of using your "NASA" for sex we would already have our future babies, now wouldn't we.

>> No.1931315

>>1931306
>So what's the deal with airfoils?

they're pretty sweet. being a fluid mechanics guy, i find it kinda sweet at how differently the educational system teaches it based on age. simplified bournoulli equation in high school, potential flow in early undergrad, boundary layer theories... then grad study in reynolds stresses n shit. is neat.

>> No.1931316
Quoted by: >>1931328

>>OP
How much math do actually know?

>> No.1931322
Quoted by: >>1931340

OP, does Project Orion give you as much of a raging nerd boner as it gives me?

>> No.1931328
Quoted by: >>1931520

>>1931316
>How much math do actually know?

well, that's pretty relative, but you could easily call my work "applied math." the navier stokes equations, and methods to solve them, represent pretty damn intense math.

i guess as far as official classes go, i've had the calc/diffeq series long ago, then linear algebra, real analysis, hilbert spaces / abstract math... then unofficially, picked up an awful lot in fluid mechanics courses.

>> No.1931331
Quoted by: >>1931347

Why is it that rockets all look like penises? Is it because engineers are gay?

>> No.1931338
Quoted by: >>1931352

How old are you?

>> No.1931340
Quoted by: >>1931390

>>1931322
>OP, does Project Orion give you as much of a raging nerd boner as it gives me?

oh god yes. yes it does. elegant, relatively simple, relatively low tech, fucking powerful and efficient... do love.

>> No.1931347

>>1931331
>Why is it that rockets all look like penises? Is it because engineers are gay?
actually i've found that best engineers in academia and industry have been generally "cool" guys and very much not "gay." we drink heavily and play sports, but we're also good at academic work. unlike, say, the "hard science" losers that aren't legitimately bright and end up very one-dimensional.

>> No.1931352

>>1931338
>How old are you?

27.

>> No.1931368
Quoted by: >>1931394

Why do engineers tend to be arrogant, less than brilliant cocks?

>> No.1931385

>>OP
What is your opinion on Solaris by Russian auteur Andrei Tarkovsky?

>> No.1931390
Quoted by: >>1931405

>>1931340

>>oh god yes. yes it does. elegant, relatively simple, relatively low tech, fucking powerful and efficient... do love.

Really? It's considered kind of a boondoggle. The stress that pulsed nuclear drives put on the superstructures of ferries necessitated frequent maintinence, meaining the development of novel robots to perform that maintinence, which meant the construction of whole new autolabor facilities to produce those robots and so on.

I understand the original drivers were integrated into bell-shaped (or bullet shaped?) vessels where this wasn't a problem, but the partial test ban treaty remains in effect even 144 years on.

As a result the largest vessels that are practical to construct in orbit are built a bit like skyscrapers with skeletal frames along which supply capsules are affixed, with the drive unit at one end and the passenger module at the other end.

Virgin Bigelow's in the process of refitting the fleet with nuclear lightbulb drives at the moment, but my understanding is that this will meaningfully reduce their top speed. One pulse drive ferry is being kept with the intention of turning it into an interstellar probe, but the rest are ditching pulsed nuclear for lightbulb.

>> No.1931394
Quoted by: >>1931407 >>1931513

>>1931368
>Why do engineers tend to be arrogant, less than brilliant cocks?

(a) depends on the engineering discipline. i.e., civil engineers are in awe of aerospace.
(b) i agree, there's a lot of that shit, almost entirely with undergrads though. it has something to with *other* engineers basically creating everything of merit over the entire course of human history, and quite often knowing as much about the hard sciences as the scientists themselves. punk undergrads think that a bunch of "aerospace engineers" working out a moon landing somehow makes them look better.

>> No.1931405

>>1931390
i gotta stop drinkin, made me wonder how long i've been blacked out.

>> No.1931407
Quoted by: >>1931483

>>1931394
>knowing as much about the hard sciences as the scientists themselves

It's baffling that engineers continually say this. If I spend all my time reading about physics and you spend yours reading about the applications of physics, there's just no way that you could know more about it than I do. Respective intelligence aside, it's just fucking impossible.

>> No.1931431
Quoted by: >>1931483

Any tips for being successful as an undergrad engineer?

>> No.1931450
Quoted by: >>1931497

can you give me a solid model for a gas generator cycle turbopump?

>> No.1931483
Quoted by: >>1931516 >>1931546

>>1931407
>It's baffling that engineers continually say this. If I spend all my time reading about physics and you spend yours reading about the applications of physics, there's just no way that you could know more about it than I do. Respective intelligence aside, it's just fucking impossible.

except that we don't spend all our time reading about applications, especially in aerospace. for example, in fluid mechanics i've studied everything from the quantum effects of gasses to statistical mechanics to continuum mechanics to turbulence, with practically no "application" to speak of, other than what we were encouraged to draw out of the fundamentals. i've taken graduate level courses in physics, math, computer science... and at the same time, in my grad department, we have people that did undergrad work in all those that moved to engineering for grad work.

you speak as if the multidisciplinary education necessarily means knowing less about any specific area, and you are mistaken.

>>1931431
>Any tips for being successful as an undergrad engineer?
yes.
1) never ever miss a class for any reason. hit by a bus on campus? go to the hospital after class. your studies are a full time job-- sometimes much more so.
2) start early on work, and don't copy from others no matter how tempting. if at all possible, avoid working in groups (in your non group-design classes). it brings everyone down. however, explaining the stuff you struggled with to lesser students will help you even more.

>> No.1931497

>>1931450
not my gig, but i have done a decent amount of work with turbofans. what exactly do you mean by "model", what aspect are you modeling?

only text i have on the subject is oates' "aerothermodynamics of gas turbine and rocket propulsion" and it's at my office so i'll have to go by memory...

>> No.1931499
Quoted by: >>1931549

OP, is there anything you'd like to ask me?

I'll understand if you consider it a "shits and giggles" type of thing and don't buy into the whole "posting from the future" aspect, I'm quite accustomed to that. But there's probably a lot about modern aerospace design that would interest you.

>> No.1931513

>>1931394
>civil engineers are in awe of aerospace.

Civil/Transport here, and I disagree

>> No.1931516
Quoted by: >>1931547 >>1931558

>>1931483
>>1931483

Ever had trouble starting out.

I just started college and precalc is kicking my ass.
It didn't take long for me to see that i needed college algebra first but whatever.
I am looming around a 60 something right now.

I like pre-calc i like working through stuff i don't understand but the pacing is fast.
any experience with that.

>> No.1931519

Do you see hypersonic ramjet powered aircraft being practical anytime in the next 50-100 years?

>> No.1931520
Quoted by: >>1931562

>>1931328
Were you a math undergrad? Also, do you use a lot of abstract algebra?

>> No.1931546
Quoted by: >>1931587

>>1931483
Take out the word "applications" and replace it with something more specific and my point still stands, you defensive ass. There is no way you can know more about something as a generalist than someone who specializes in it. Only an arrogant dick would think otherwise.

>> No.1931547
Quoted by: >>1931552 >>1931582

>>1931516
lol bro, im a junior in high school and im teaching myself precalc. Im making sure im going into calc next year. CMON DUDE. whats your major anyway. BTW this isnt OP

>> No.1931549
Quoted by: >>1931625

>>1931499
hmmm.... i guess i'd have to ask if there were any groundbreaking advances, or was it just a steady, boring advance?

>> No.1931552

>>1931547
You might not want to tell people that, considering that the global 4chan rules demand that you be over 18, even if you're only posting on SFW boards.

>> No.1931558

>>1931516
i actually flunked out cause i got high all the time and never went to class my first try, but it wasn't for lack of effort. when i returned on a mission, i did extremely well. i now have a BS, MS, and i'm at a top 5 uni for phd. but i am very very very not typical.

all i can tell you now is to put in all the effort you can, never miss a class, work on assignments the second you get them... and if you still get bad grades at the end of the semester.... then i'm sorry. you could always go into business/chemistry/biology/whatever else troll thing.

>> No.1931562

>>1931520
>Were you a math undergrad? Also, do you use a lot of abstract algebra?

no, aerospace undergrad. no, i don't really use abstract algebra, but i'm aware of its underpinnings in what i do. i do use some rather advanced linear algebra.

>> No.1931582
Quoted by: >>1931596

>>1931547
Yeah i know.
I come from a shit public school.
The whole school system was so easy i just stopped doing anything. While i meet people from other parts of town. And ohh yea i did ap physic. and ap calculus.

I did good enough on the sat to get accepted. i didn't even study and got a respectable score.

I just don't know how to study and focus. I need to do something or i will be a failure also underage bait.

>> No.1931587
Quoted by: >>1931619

>>1931546
>Take out the word "applications" and replace it with something more specific and my point still stands, you defensive ass. There is no way you can know more about something as a generalist than someone who specializes in it. Only an arrogant dick would think otherwise.

see, you don't understand what "generalist" and "specialist" mean in these circumstances. "physics" and "math" are about as general as it can get. there is infinite room for specialization.

i think most good engineering phd's are going to be know a lot more about undergraduate physics than say, undergraduate physics majors. same for math.

what i've really come to appreciate in my recent years of advanced study is how high end study in physical sciences and math all share very distinct underpinnings that undergrads simply can't appreciate. i thought that that as an undergrad, we all did the same stuff the first couple years... basic physics, calc, chemistry... and then all the different disciplines went on to do different stuff.. everyone diverged.

but then in graduate study, i saw all the disciplines coming back together. i can use the core skills i developed with the navier stokes equations to make the maxwell equations seem comically simple by comparison.

>> No.1931596

>>1931582
>The whole school system was so easy i just stopped doing anything

same here. i barely graduated with a 1.9 gpa, and could only get into state university based on funny high test scores. i seriously flunked high school trigonometry, and now have multiple published papers with mathematics no high school teacher could comprehend.

>> No.1931619
Quoted by: >>1931635 >>1931646

>>1931587
>you don't understand what "generalist" and "specialist" mean in these circumstances

Quit quibbling about small points in my wording, you jackass. I phrased it broadly so that you'd interpret it broadly. All I'm saying is that if I've read more books about one area than someone who has read an equally large number of books about something similar but not identical, then I probably know more about my subject than he knows about it. Don't give me a bunch of obvious shit about the convergence of math and science. It's

Christ, I'm starting to wonder whether you're even who you say you are. Then again, you're certainly playing the "arrogant engineer" type perfectly.

>> No.1931625

>>1931549

>>hmmm.... i guess i'd have to ask if there were any groundbreaking advances, or was it just a steady, boring advance?

Does solarnet qualify? The application of quantum entanglement to communication between the Earth, the Moon and Mars. It's also the basis for the service that I'm using to talk to you now.

>> No.1931635
Quoted by: >>1931699

>>1931619
>All I'm saying is that if I've read more books about one area than someone who has read an equally large number of books about something similar but not identical, then I probably know more about my subject than he knows about it.

sure, i haven't disagreed with that. i'm more pointing out that (a) undergrads in any field don't know shit, and (b) there is an amazing amount of overlap in graduate study.

i hesitate to even call engineering a subset of physics. they're just different approaches. i've seen engineers (professors, natch) that were functionally retarded when it comes to any kind of practical problem in their own field, and i've seen theoretical physicists take apart a tractor engine.

>> No.1931646
Quoted by: >>1931699

>>1931619
oh and i'd add that there is a lot to be said for multidisciplinary education that many "hard science" people can lack. by attacking very different physical problems we can gain insight into specifics we might not otherwise find.

>> No.1931699

>>1931646
>>1931635

Christ, you're annoying. You take apart my points until I distill it to its more simple formulation and then you tell me you didn't even disagree with me in the first place. Also, I don't have any problem with interdisciplinary education, only the arrogance some engineers display.

Uh, I'm fucking done with you.

>> No.1931709
Quoted by: >>1931753

>>1931699
(declaring victory!)

don't be butthurt big guy. just accept that experienced engineers know a fuckton more about physics than undergrad physicists.

>> No.1931719
File: 275 KB, 445x380, 1279841469505.png [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1931719

>>1931699

You jelly of the engineering master race?

>> No.1931723
Quoted by: >>1931753

>>1931699

you came into this thread and immediately started acting like a dick.

you're the asshole here.

>> No.1931727

I'm getting out of the Navy next year and enrolling at a community college to start my degree in the Fall. I'm VERY interested in Aerospace Engineering, especially propulsion and combustion. Two questions:

1.) Are first year students at age 21 weird?
2.) Is Aerospace Engineering the best program for someone with my interests (some of the aviators I worked with recommended physics or chemistry)?

>> No.1931732
Quoted by: >>1931757

Engineers are the jocks of the scientific world and community. That's why they hate you, because you spend all your time fucking girls getting drunk at the world's finest universities and make more money than you deserve.

>> No.1931753

>>1931709
When did I ever compare undergrads to graduates? You're amazingly poor at arguing, you cuntbag. Fucking strawmans and red herring everywhere.

>>1931723
Yeah, I know. After my first post, I was trying to start a stupid argument. Hence the needless fucking swearing. I don't reneg on my points, but it was still cheap entertainment, lol.

>> No.1931757
Quoted by: >>1931795

>>1931727
Dude, one of the smartest guys in my real analysis class last Spring was 26. It's not uncommon.
>>1931732
>jocks of the scientific world
This made me lol.

>> No.1931775
Quoted by: >>1931795

>>1931727
Guy in my class is 38. Has kids, a fulltime job and lies to his boss about where he spends his time.

And he's not even the oldest!

You will NEVER be the oldest guy in class. Ever. Prolly be the youngest.

>> No.1931795

>>1931757
>>1931775
That's good to hear. I know a lot of people are going back to school to get second degrees, but I wanted to hear it from you guys.

Hoping OP answers my propulsion question. Anyone else with experience feel free to chime in. If chem or physics are the way for an aspiring rocket scientist to go, speak!

>> No.1931804
Quoted by: >>1931820

OP I want to get a masters in Aero and try to go to work at a skunk works division at Lockheed-Martin. What are my chances, considering i have ~3.7 undergrad GPA right now (first semester sophomore).

>> No.1931808
Quoted by: >>1931837

>>1931727

awesome questions. i've been good friends with multiple ex-military guys in aerospace engineering.

>I'm getting out of the Navy next year and enrolling at a community college to start my degree in the Fall. I'm VERY interested in Aerospace Engineering, especially propulsion and combustion. Two questions:

>1.) Are first year students at age 21 weird?
not at all man. hell, i came back to school at age 21. you're an average of 2-3 years older than the others... but you're presumably more mature and know what you're doing. you could obviously pass for 18-19 anyway. don't even worry about it for a second.

>2.) Is Aerospace Engineering the best program for someone with my interests (some of the aviators I worked with recommended physics or chemistry)?

propulsion/combustion is really at the crossroads of chemistry and fluid mechanics... but not a lot of chemists have the chops to handle the fluids or computational side of it. i really think aere is the way to go.

obviously i can't know the cross-section of everyone in the field, but case study:

one of my best friends did undergrad with me in aere. got hired direct by GE to do propulsion work. he's currently getting full salary to do his MS to learn more about propulsion.

do aerospace, man.

>> No.1931809
Quoted by: >>1931837

>>1931727
older students are the coolest kind

>> No.1931817
Quoted by: >>1931824

Is it good to go into aerospace engineering if you want to design and test shuttles, rockets, and/or planes?
Is it a good career to get into?

>> No.1931820

>>1931804
i can't really tell you man. i did get job offers at places considered more exclusive than skunkworks after my MS. but if you can nail an interview, you can get in anywhere. people can and do get dreamjobs, but it's never ever ever about your gpa.

>> No.1931824

>>1931817
be more vague/broad?

>> No.1931837
Quoted by: >>1931857

>>1931808
Thanks for the reply. It's refreshing to hear that older guys are ok (though I don't think I have the right to call myself "older" anymore).
>propulsion/combustion is really at the crossroads of chemistry and fluid mechanics... but not a lot of chemists have the chops to handle the fluids or computational side of it. i really think aere is the way to go.
Good to hear. I think I was going to go with aeroe regardless, but it's nice to know I won't be playing catch up with a bunch of chemists in that field.
>>1931809
I don't know if I'm a cool guy, but I'll give it a shot.

>> No.1931857

>>1931837
i actually got recruited by a prof at my current school to do computational combustion work for scramjets here.

when you're talking about combustion, the fluid mechanics are far more complex than the chemistry. our most advanced work at the top of the field doesn't really use anything more than freshman concepts of reaction rates and thermal effects. we just do it computationally, with dozens of species. i definitely see more combustion research being done by aero/mech's than by chemists.

>> No.1931864
Quoted by: >>1932010 >>1932073

what are your opinions on mechanical engineering technology? Im not looking at getting into hardcore R&D but more along the lines of testing systems and components.

>> No.1931867
File: 662 KB, 844x1200, 1253940640634.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1931867
Quoted by: >>1932020

So I got a question.

What's the role of computers? How much of the calculation are done by people?

I can sorta calculate the distance to Mars and the approximate path but could a properly trained pilot replace the computer?

What is the minimum automasation you need? And what's the best path to get to Mars?

You want to use the Sun's gravity to increase rocket speed as much as you can, and have earth going past the mars and then mars swinging around, I think?

>> No.1932010

>>1931864
>what are your opinions on mechanical engineering technology? Im not looking at getting into hardcore R&D but more along the lines of testing systems and components.

i don't know too much about that specific of a major. is that a cross between mechE and industrial engineering?

if you know you want to go into that specific of a field and that major is the most applicable, go for it. i only know that testing of things like electronic components are just kind of an aside for most engineering majors, though a bit more focus with EE/CprE guys. NDE (non destructive evaluation) is also really really awesome field to get into, but that's strictly physical/structural analysis.

>> No.1932020
Quoted by: >>1932043

>>1931867
gonna use my engineering brain here and hazard a guess that this is the guy posting the "meanwhile in the engineering dept" gay porn images.

>> No.1932025

What do you think of nuclear thermal propulsion?

>> No.1932043
File: 36 KB, 1004x742, saturnplane_cassini_big.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
1932043

>>1932020
Wha? No, I'm new!

I wants to know if the giant pile of dynamite in my backyard needs a laptop or two!

Anyway, here have a sexy saturn/cassini pic.

>> No.1932073

>>1931864

The MET degree offered in my school is a joke. The freshies who can't make it in freshman chemistry and mathematics all change their major to MET. METs aren't requied to take any mathematics courses beyond calc 1 and they work almost exclusively on applications.

You'd probably be just as well off with a 2 year associates degree.

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